In pictures

Jumièges Abbey in Normandy // In pictures

Jumieges Abbey in Normandy, France

One of the great things about travel is coming across something unexpectedly amazing. I’d never heard of Jumièges Abbey until spotting it on the map on a last-minute trip to Normandy. Near the banks of the Seine between Rouen and Le Havre, this Benedictine abbey was originally built in the seventh century. Not that it latest long – it was destroyed first by the Vikings then later by the English and the Huguenots. But each time it was rebuilt, until finally being abandoned after the French Revolution and pillaged for its white limestone. But the ruins left behind are beautiful and atmospheric – the church’s 50-metre-high towers, cloisters complete with a yew tree growing in the centre and precariously balanced arched columns. And if you’re there in summer, you can visit by night when the abbey’s lit up and its stone glows in the light.

Abbaye de Jumieges in Normandy
Jumieges Abbey in Normandy
Jumieges Abbey gardens
Jumieges Abbey in black and white
Jumieges Abbey in Normandy

The details

Jumièges Abbey is around 30km from Rouen and 50km from Le Havre. It’s open 9.30am–6.30pm from 15 April to 15 September, and from 9.30am–1pm and 2.30pm–5.30pm for the rest of the year. Entry costs €6.50 per person (€4 for 18–25 year olds and free entry for under 18s).

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Jumièges Abbey in Normandy, France – On the Luce travel blog

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  • Reply
    Andrew Petcher
    October 15, 2012 at 11:10 am

    Looks magnificent!

    • Reply
      Lucy Dodsworth
      October 15, 2012 at 12:11 pm

      It was – a shame you can’t get up the towers though as the view would be amazing!

  • Reply
    Folding Mirror Poetry
    October 15, 2012 at 11:17 am

    Nice. I was on the northern coast of Brittany last month, and it’s a lovely area. Glad you enjoyed it, and thanks for sharing.

    • Reply
      Lucy Dodsworth
      October 15, 2012 at 12:11 pm

      Thanks. We did lots of family holidays to Brittany and Normandy when I was young but hadn’t been back for a while and it was lovely to go and rediscover it, and some great new places.

  • Reply
    Folding Mirror Poetry
    October 16, 2012 at 8:23 pm

    Yeh, there was an historic element to my visit too, both personally and physically through visiting Mont-Saint-Michel for the first time. I’m doing an article about it for the Travel Thru History website at the moment. They’d probably be interested in your trip if you fancied extending it into an article. Good luck…

    • Reply
      Lucy Dodsworth
      October 17, 2012 at 3:29 pm

      Thanks for the tip, I’ll have a look into that site.

  • Reply
    sappho1
    October 19, 2012 at 4:26 am

    Very nice.

  • Reply
    mercerlm
    October 22, 2012 at 11:55 pm

    Beautiful photos!

  • Reply
    On the Luce in 2012 | On the Luce
    December 24, 2012 at 12:06 pm

    […] France since. But I found out it’s well worth the stop, with its dramatic coastline and historic ruins. Just don’t mention the ferry trip back – five hours in gale-force winds that reminded me […]

  • Reply
    Kathryn
    July 23, 2013 at 9:41 am

    Hi Lucy, These are really lovely photos. We’d love to feature the second shot on our blog for our Picture Postcard series. Details here if you are interested thegreatescapesblog.wordpress.com/2013/07/22/picture-post… or if you have any other great shots from France or Belgium they’d be welcome to
    many thanks, Kathryn

    • Reply
      Lucy Dodsworth
      July 23, 2013 at 12:58 pm

      Hi Kathryn, very happy to! I will send it over and I have lots of other France and a few Belgium images so will send you the Flickr links so you can see if there’s anything else suitable.

      • Reply
        Kathryn
        July 23, 2013 at 12:59 pm

        Thanks Lucy, that’s really great. I’m sure there will be others.

  • Reply
    Capturing the colours of 2013 | On the Luce
    August 21, 2013 at 10:02 am

    […] finally my choice for white is Jumièges Abbey in Normandy. The 50-metre-high limestone towers of this former Benedictine Abbey have been standing […]

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